The Big Business of Burying Carbon

Applicants for EPA carbon-storage permits must persuade the agency that they can contain both the plume of injected carbon dioxide and a secondary plume of saltwater that the CO2 displaces from the rock—what drilling engineers call the pressure pulse. The EPA requires evidence that neither plume will contaminate drinking water while a project is operating and for a default period of 50 years after CO2 injection stops—but the agency can decide to shorten or lengthen that for a particular project. 

Stream employs a well-heeled team, including oil industry veterans and a former top EPA official, to shepherd the permit application, which was submitted in October 2020 and which remains, nearly

→ Continue reading at Wired - Science

More from author

Related posts

Advertisment

Latest posts

How to Make Money on Instagram With a Sizable (But Not Huge) Following

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Instagram, which simply began as a photo-sharing app, has evolved into a powerful digital...

How the Right Team Can Turn an Idea Into a VC-Backed Company

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. As a product-centric engineer, I've always loved building things that can help other people....

7 Quick Ways to Make Money Investing $1,000

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. If you're sitting on at least $1,000 and it's scratching an itch in your...