How Hans Berger’s quest for telepathy spurred modern brain science

A brush with death led Hans Berger to invent a machine that could eavesdrop on the brain.

In 1893, when he was 19, Berger fell off his horse during maneuvers training with the German military and was nearly trampled. On that same day, his sister, far away, got a bad feeling about Hans. She talked her father into sending a telegram asking if everything was all right.

To young Berger, this eerie timing was no coincidence: It was a case of “spontaneous telepathy,” he later wrote. Hans was convinced that he had transmitted his thoughts of mortal fear to his sister — somehow.

So he decided to study psychiatry,

→ Continue reading at Science News

More from author

Related posts

Advertisment

Latest posts

The 6 Most Important Things to Do When Starting a New Business

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. “A big business starts small.” – Richard BransonThis legendary British billionaire seemed to grasp...

Trying to trend, politicians take on the TikTok challenge

If all politics is theater, Rep. Tim Ryan is one of its subtler actors. A moderate Democrat from Ohio’s 13th Congressional District who has...

Baker Hughes joins oil rivals in pausing Russian operations

By Anne D’Innocenzio | Associated PressNEW YORK — U.S. oil field services company Baker Hughes said Saturday that it was suspending new investments for...