The Malaria Vaccine Is a Big Deal, but Not a Silver Bullet

RTS,S proves that shots can work against parasites. But to eradicate this disease, scientists say we need more than just one tool. 

When Patrick Duffy started his career at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in 1991, scientists were already a few years into testing a first-of-its-kind vaccine that would protect against malaria. Thirty years later, the World Health Organization has finally recommended the product of that research as a malaria intervention for children under age 5 in Africa. The RTS,S vaccine, also called Mosquirix, is the first vaccine to protect against a parasite.

Duffy, now the chief of the Laboratory of

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