Redefining ‘flesh-colored’ bandages makes medicine more inclusive

When Linda Oyesiku was a child, she skinned her knee on her school’s playground. The school nurse cleaned her up and covered the wound with a peach-tinted bandage. On Oyesiku’s dark skin, the bandage stuck out, so Oyesiku colored it with a brown marker. Years later, Oyesiku, now a medical student at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, needed to conceal a wound on her face after undergoing surgery. Well aware that the surgeon’s office was unlikely to have a supply of brown bandages on hand, she came prepared with her own box. Those episodes left her wondering, though: Why were such bandages not more widely available?

→ Continue reading at Science News

More from author

Related posts

Advertisment

Latest posts

A Successful Cybersecurity Company Isn't About Fancy Technology

February 25, 2021 6 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. We’re living in an information age where data is the...

Should You Use Your Own Name or Create a Brand Name for Your Business?

February 25, 2021 6 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. A friend and ex-colleague of mine recently left her full-time...

Homebuilders grapple with land shortage, soaring lumber costs

By Alex Veiga | The Associated Press U.S. homebuilders are poised to benefit this spring homebuying season amid strong demand, low mortgage rates and...