Why A Musician Breathed New Life Into a 17,000-Year-Old Conch Shell Horn

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An artist’s rendition of the conch of Marsoulas being played in a cave where it was found by researchers in the early 20th Century. G. Tosello

G. Tosello

A horn made from a conch shell over 17,000 years ago has blasted out musical notes for the first time in millennia.

Archaeologists originally found the seashell in 1931, in a French cave that contains prehistoric wall paintings. They speculated that the cave’s past occupants had used the shell as a ceremonial cup for shared drinks, and that a hole in its tip was just accidental damage.

But some

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